USM LAC Summer 2014 Course Descriptions

 

ANT 101J     Anthropology: The Cultural View

This course is a basic introductory survey of cultural anthropology.  It examines the differences between cultures as well as cultural universals, and the relationship between social organization, ideology, economics, and political structure in different types of societies.  It reviews the various theoretical approaches in cultural anthropology’s attempt to explain human behavior, presenting examples from foraging farming, and contemporary industrial societies through readings and films.  Cr 3

   

CON 302        Pharmacology

This course provides an overview of the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The major drug categories are reviewed with emphasis placed on the therapeutic use, action, and adverse reactions of selected prototype drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits and risks of drug therapy, thereby preparing the health professional for safe, therapeutic pharmacologic interventions. There is no clinical component to this course. For nursing majors, CON 302/502 must be taken within one year of enrolling in NUR 323/325 or 541/542.  Prerequisites: BIO 211 or SCI 172 or SCI 270 and sophomore standing. Cr 3

CON 356         Concepts in Community Health

This course introduces the concepts and principles basic to the development and maintenance of the community's health. The epidemiological process guides the survey of current major health issues. The course focuses on the health issues of groups in the community at local, state, national, and global levels. Cr 3

CON 502      Pharmacology

This course provides an overview of the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.  The major drug categories are reviewed with emphasis placed on therapeutic use, action, and adverse reactions of selected prototype drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits and risks of drug therapy, thereby preparing the health professional for safe, therapeutic pharmacologic  interventions. Specifically, this course focuses on the needs of second degree students and is limited to nursing students holding a baccalaureate degree in another field. There is no clinical component.  Cr 3

 

CON 556         Concepts in Community Health

This course introduces the concepts and principles basic to the development and maintenance of the community's health. The epidemiological process guides the survey of current major health issues. The course focuses on the health issues of groups in the community at local, state, national, and global levels. Cr 3

EDU 562       Linguistics and Cultural Diversity in the Classroom

This course examines the nature of language and cultural differences among learners of various ethnic and racial backgrounds. The exploration of diversity provides opportunities for participants to develop a personal awareness of the role of cultural conditioning in classroom encounters; to reflect on and to confront personal biases as they relate to teaching; to acquire the skills and resources for an ethno-relative approach to delivering instruction; and to make language- and topic-related choices compatible with learner differences. Cr 3

 

EPC 564         Eff Student-Centered Inq Unit     OR    Challenge Solving Inquiry

With examples, planning and implementation steps as resources, you will plan a unit, for any subject, in which your students work to solve a relevant problem. Assessment strategies, reasoning skills, scaffolding structures to ensure success, and elements of problem-based learning, expeditionary learning and service learning will be discussed. The unit will forward your students' achievement of curriculum content standards, critical thinking, communications, creativity/innovation, interdependent learning, self-directed learning and appropriate use of technology. Cr 3

 

HCE 605       Psychological Measurement & Evaluation

This course focuses on group tests and related measurement techniques. The course content includes a review of the history of testing, current issues, fundamental statistics for understanding, evaluating, and using tests, including selected aptitude, intelligence, achievement, interest, and personality tests. A variety of standardized and non-standardized evaluation measures will be reviewed.  Cr 3

 

HCE 686       Internship: Counselor Education

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate formal coursework with on-the-job experience in selected institutions. Prerequisite: HCE 690.  Cr 1-15

 

HUM 105F     Basic Photography

This course is an introduction to black and white photography, designed to help students gain understanding through “hands-on” photographic work. Lectures include classroom discussions concerning the history and aesthetics of photography, and techniques include camera and lens functions, exposure methods, basic black and white film processing, printmaking, print finishing, and presentation techniques.  Cr 3

 

HUM 201      Creative Writing: Cultivating Your Inner Muse

This course is designed to help students hone their creative strategies and inspire them to commit to the practice of writing. We will explore the practical implications of creative expression. In addition to investigating the genres of fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry, students will identify and devise an approach to writing that works for them. This course is appropriate for novices and experienced writers alike and will include discussions of readings and traditional workshop response to students' writing. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English.  Cr 3

 

HUM 275        Discovering the Past: History Close to Home

Students will delve into the study of the past through a variety of historiographical techniques, within the context of the history of Lewiston.  Students will develop a variety of research skills, including discovering and interpreting public and genealogical records, archaeological field reports, physical artifacts and architecture, as well as primary and secondary texts.  Students will also encounter a variety of hands-on techniques, including fieldwalking and conducting oral-history interviews.  The course offers an entry-point into the study of history while giving students valuable research and analytical skills that are readily transferable to other academic disciplines or professional life.  Cr 3

 

HUM 304 Writing Children’s Literature: How to Craft Compelling Stories

An exploration of how details, characters, and voices create compelling children’s stories. This course will include text readings, multiple online writing assignments, along with analyzing several children's books and critiquing and commenting on classmates' work. Students will also write their own children's picture book. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr 3.

 

HUM 369        Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles  

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 1.5

 

HUM 413        Job Search Skills for the 21st Century

In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 1.5

 

HUM 447         Internship     

This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 3-6

 

LCC 110C      College Writing: Language and Literacies

This first-tier writing instruction course introduces students to one or more themes of the Core curriculum. It emphasizes the connections between reading and writing, and students learn how thinking and the language that conveys it develop and change through the process of drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. The course introduces students to the conventions of expository academic writing and links to co-curricular activities of the Core. (Note that some students are also required to concurrently take the 1-credit companion course, LCC 111) This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 3

LCC 111C      College Writing: Language and Literacies: Enrichment

This course is required for those students identified as needing extra support to improve their writing skills. The course provides additional instruction and extended opportunities for applying pre-writing, drafting/developing, revising, and editing strategies related to the same essays assigned in LCC 110. The course focus includes attention to basic elements of effective writing, such as unity, coherence, and emphasis. Class time will also be devoted to addressing topics that represent the most common error patterns in college-level academic writing, such as weak thesis sentences, inconsistent point of view, and sentence-level grammar and punctuation error patterns. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4

LCC 130K      The Biology of Human Health w/ Lab

This course introduces basic concepts of biology and explores how these concepts relate to human health. It also explores natural scientific methods of inquiry and applies these methods to complex issues involving the creation and maintenance of human health. Further, the course explores the importance of societal factors in health maintenance. Prerequisite: QR. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4

 LCC 150D     Statistics for Informed Decision Making

This course introduces and applies quantitative analyses to address real world questions. It applies descriptive statistics, sampling and significance testing, correlation, and regression analysis to issues related to the four themes of the Common Core. The course provides the opportunity to interpret and analyze statistical decision making, and identifies data misconceptions and misuses. Prerequisite: math proficiency. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3

LCC 200E     Creative Critical Inquiry

This writing instruction course introduces students to criteria for identifying and constructing well-reasoned arguments, fosters the discovery and use of students' critical/analytical voice in their writing, and develops skills for incorporating, interpreting and integrating the views of others. It provides the opportunity to refine critical thinking abilities by analyzing everyday life experience, including how culture shapes our sense of reality and ourselves. The course highlights the importance of generating good questions and tolerating ambiguity when seeking to understand complex issues. Prerequisite: College Writing. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 4

 

LCC 230K     Environmental Science, Policy, & Sustainability with Lab

This course presents a multidisciplinary survey of the scientific principles underlying energy utilization, nutrient cycles, global warming, population, and natural resource policy and management. The lectures will be comprised of Socratic interactions and group discussions relating regional, national and global components that encompass ecology, economics, politics, and social endeavors.  This course includes a laboratory involving field and lab work and service learning efforts.  Cr 4

 

LCC 250G      Thinking About the Arts; Thinking Through the Arts

This course explores the tools and strategies important in the interpretation of literature and the arts and encourages an appreciation of the role of literature and the arts in social, political, and cultural life. It promotes an understanding of and an appreciation for the creative expression of shared cultural beliefs in various historical periods of cultures around the world and examines literature and the arts as potential critiques of culture. Co-curricular opportunities are included, especially in connection with the Atrium Gallery. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3

 

LCC 370         Toward a Global Ethics

This writing instruction course assists students in articulating and assessing their own values. It examines the range of ethical theories and positions and explores the influence of particular cultural ideologies on ethical beliefs. The course considers the ethical principles implied by democracy, sustainability, justice, and difference. It examines ethical issues and dilemmas faced by individuals, organizations, and nations while exploring personal and collective decision-making processes in a global context. Prerequisite: College Writing. Cr 4

 

LCC 480         Senior Seminar:  Justice

This course provides writing instruction experience for students from LAC's four degree programs. Students complete a major research and writing project addressing one of the four themes of the Common Core from an interdisciplinary approach. Prerequisite: ENG 100C or LCC 110C; LCC 200E or LCC 370E; HUM 300, and LOS 300 OR SBS 320. Cr 3

 

LOS 270         Exploring Leadership on Campus

This exploratory leadership studies course is designed to approach leadership on campus and beyond as a relational phenomenon from self-development and strengths-based leadership to group dynamics and roles, complex organizations and their structures, teamwork, ethics, decision making, conflict resolution, diversity, and change.  Concepts from leadership theory, current literature and research are introduced, discussed, and implemented by individual students as they develop effective leadership skills.    Cr 3

 

LOS 299       Writing in the Major

Students majoring in LOS are required to register for this course simultaneously with their registration in LOS 300 Organizational Theory.  It meets for an hour per week of writing instruction for the LOS major.  Cr 1

LOS 300       Organizational Theory

This is a foundational course that provides a solid overview of organizational theories in leadership. Current organizational issues are analyzed using structural, human resource, cultural, and political frameworks and the case method. Issues examined include leadership, organizational design, planning, change, decision making, communication, and control. This is an excellent course for students interested in how organizations work. Students in the LOS major must complete this required course with a grade of a B- or better as a condition of their degree. This course includes writing instruction. Prerequisite: familiarity with the Blackboard online learning community. Completion of College Writing with a C or better is required for LOS majors and preferred for all other students.  Cr 3

 

LOS 301         Group Dynamics

This course gives students an understanding of how people behave in groups and the skills needed by group members to participate effectively in group activities. It provides a theoretical foundation for how groups function, with focus on group process and development; and it discusses how these theories can be applied to a wide range of group settings. This course uses experiential techniques to help students develop critical skills and understanding of group dynamics. Cr 3

LOS 317        New Media & Social Networking: Identity & Expression

How are private and public identities established online? Are political and social movements built, organized, even undermined by social networking and online culture? Do online communities impact real world communication, language, and thought? Read critical theory on new media and explore technological and cultural associations with this nascent but pervasive phenomenon. Cr 3

LOS 329       Research Methods

This course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods which can be used in organizational planning and decision making and in the social and behavioral sciences. The course will cover topic areas related to the application of appropriate methods of inquiry and includes completion of an applied project. Strongly recommended for students going on to graduate school, careers in consulting, or human resource management.  Prerequisite: LCC 150D or equivalent.  Cr 3

 

LOS 330       Leadership in Different Cultures

Students will explore leadership practices in multiple cultures and how our increasing interactions with these diverse leadership styles have changed our conception of leadership in the U.S. This course will help students determine the skills they will need to take on a leadership role in a global society. Cr 3

 

LOS 333       Portfolio Development

This Portfolio Development course is offered to the adult learner who is preparing a competency based, experiential, academic portfolio, documenting their college-level knowledge, competencies, and abilities. This course supports students in improving the skills and knowledge needed to document and communicate their prior learning in the area of leadership and organizational studies. At the end of the course, students submit a completed academic portfolio for assessment to USM¿s Office of Prior Learning for possible additional credits.  Prerequisites:  College writing or the equivalent, leadership LOS 350 either concurrently or completed, resume submission, and subsequent permission by instructor.  Cr 3

 

LOS 336         Dealing with Difficult People and Behaviors

It has been stated that everyone is someone's difficult person. Almost daily, we come in contact with people we would characterize as difficult. They are the people we work with, sell to, depend on, and live with. There are intimidators, manipulators, analyzers, know-it-alls, overly friendly, accommodators, chronic complainers and whiners. Their actions consume time, energy and emotion at the expense of productivity and morale. This course provides fresh insights and immediately usable skills needed to quickly, confidently and assertively identify and deal with various types of people, difficult or not, in a variety of contexts while maintaining your own self confidence. Cr 3.

 

LOS 337       Project Management

This course provides a solid foundation in Project Management, covering up-to-date information on how good project, program, and portfolio management can help you achieve organizational success.  Students will learn what a good project is and the various phases of managing a project -- from initiation and kick-off to implementation and oversight to proper closing and documentation of results.  They will develop an understanding of the project management process, the fluid nature of real-world projects, and how to adapt to changing conditions.  Furthermore, they will acquire the ability to efficiently manage a project of reasonable scope. Thus, the course will focus on the practical aspects of day-to-day project management and will include numerous real-world examples from corporate settings.  Cr 3

LOS 350       Leadership

This foundational course for students of leadership will provide learners with a review of major leadership concepts and theories designed to incorporate research findings, practice, skill-building, and direct application to real world scenarios. Beyond leadership concepts and theories, the course will cover a variety of topics impacting today's leaders as a foundation for learning including power and ethics, leadership development, politics and influence, decision making, and creativity and innovation. An experiential design is used along with traditional online techniques to help students reflect on their personal leadership styles and examine their approaches to leading others in diverse organizational settings. Students in the LOS major must complete this required course with a grade of a B- or better as a condition of their degree. Completion of College Writing with a C or better is required for LOS majors and preferred for all other students. Cr 3 

 

LOS 351         Exploring Transformational Leadership

In the increasingly uncertain world of today, new leadership is needed for radical positive change.  Transformational Leadership offers one such avenue for unleashing the potential in individuals and situations.  This one credit course is an in depth exploration of Transformational Leadership.  Students will gain an understanding of the theory, others critiques of the theory, and practical application of the theory.  Prior Leadership courses are preferred but not required.  Cr 1
 
LOS 369         Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

LOS 373         Managing Non-Profits

This course will familiarize students with major concepts in the management of a non-profit and will help them develop the skills to utilize this material in applied situations.  Students will explore the mission of the non-profit, marketing and funding, effective strategies for developing relationships and performance, and ways to enhance leadership skills.  Cr 3

 

LOS 413         Job Search Skills for the 21 Century

In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

LOS 447       Internship

This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr. 3-6

 

LOS 470       Leadership Abroad

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues in intercultural leadership and to provide tools to be an effective leader in a globally aware environment. Through international travel, a variety of readings, and reflection exercises, students will examine a diversity of leadership situations and the cultural factors that influence the quality of a leader’s performance. In order to help apply theory to experience, students will be given a number of opportunities to articulate ideas about the concepts explored through presentation, group discussion, and writing. Prerequisite: instructor permission.  Cr 6

 

LOS 599          Topics: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

Mindfulness is about paying attention without judgment to what is being presented to us in our lives moment by moment right here, right now and then responding to this moment from a place of balance/center rather than reacting from old patterns. In this course we study Mindfulness using practices based on the Kabat-Zinn Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Program and practices based on the work of Professor Nancy Hathaway. After learning these Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction practices, students will explore ways to integrate Mindfulness into work, family, health, and relationships, particularly into Teaching, Nursing, Social Work, Counseling, and the Healthcare Professions.  

 

Note:  Because this is a one week intensive course, be prepared to read at least two chapters/night and the remaining chapters during the two weeks following the course. The Take Home Exam Part I will be due on the last day of the week long course, and Take Home Examination Part II will be due at the end of the two weeks following the course postmarked no later than three weeks after the course ends.  Mindfulness Exercises homework will be due each day.  This course fulfills the ""Applied Topics"" requirement for the SBS Counseling Concentration.  Cr 3              

 

LOS 610       Methods of Inquiry

This course considers the concepts, principles, and methods that may be used in research for organizational and leadership studies. Quantitative and qualitative research methods that can be used in organizational planning and decision making and in the social and behavioral sciences will be considered. The course will cover topic areas related to the application of appropriate methods of inquiry.  Cr 3

 

LOS 641         Exploring Transformational Leadership

In the increasingly uncertain world of today, new leadership is needed for radical positive change.  Transformational Leadership offers one such avenue for unleashing the potential in individuals and situations.  This one credit course is an in depth exploration of Transformational Leadership.  Students will gain an understanding of the theory, others critiques of the theory, and practical application of the theory.  Prior Leadership courses are preferred but not required.  Cr 1

LOS 661         Ethical & Spiritual Dimensions of Leadership

What are the roles of ethics and spirituality in leadership? Where does ethics end and spirituality begin? This course approaches the study of leadership from the perspectives of meaning, values, and human connectedness. The hunger to understand our lives, be part of a larger whole, be complete, and serve are examined as they relate to the leadership process.  Cr 3

 

LOS 670       Leadership Abroad

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues in intercultural leadership and to provide tools to be an effective leader in a globally aware environment. Through international travel, a variety of readings, and reflection exercises, students will examine a diversity of leadership situations and the cultural factors that influence the quality of a leader’s performance. In order to help apply theory to experience, students will be given a number of opportunities to articulate ideas about the concepts explored through presentation, group discussion, and writing. Prerequisite: instructor permission.  Cr 3

OTH 504       Applied Research I

This course introduces the student to the spectrum of investigative strategies that can be used to answer questions of concern tooccupational therapists. Students will learn to examine critically current research and to master basic research skills. Students will practice basic research skills through targeted assignments, and the development of research questions, a literature review, and a research project.  Cr 3

 

OTH 605       Applied Research II

This course provides the opportunity for students to expand their application of research concepts to the investigation of an occupational therapy question, need, or evaluation of occupational therapy practice. Students will conduct a research project, culminating in a public poster presentation. Course sessions and assignments will be devoted to guiding students through the research process.  Cr 3

 

OTH 608         Reflections on Practice: Cognition and Perception

This course explores integration of brain function and its relationship to occupational performance across the life span. Emphasis is on how human beings learn and participate in their environments, with respect to the perceptual and cognitive functions of the brain that are most pertinent to occupational performance. Reflecting on their previous fieldwork experiences, the class examines the relationship of states of damage and dysfunction to engagement in occupations. Students will discuss the psycho-social, physical, and developmental practice domains of occupational therapy as they relate to brain functions. Students will understand assessments, and begin to design preparatory and occupation-based interventions for people, regarding perceptual and cognitive issues.  Cr 3

 

OTH 616       Professional Presentations

This course provides students with the opportunity to disseminate their research results in a professional forum. Students will work with a faculty advisor to prepare their research projects for professional presentation to the community. Course sessions and assignments will be devoted to guiding students through the research dissemination process and transition to the role of a professional. Prerequisites: OTH 504 and OTH 605.  Cr 1

 

OTH 618         Contextual Considerations in Practice

This course utilizes and builds on the fieldwork experiences of students as they gain knowledge and reflect on observed practice skills needed for basic management. An examination of the context of practice will incorporate readings, assignments, and class discussions of effective supervision, reimbursement mechanisms, accrediting agencies, and their impact on departmental operations. Regulation, politics, and changing policies of service provision will be studied, as well as the ethical considerations, program evaluation, and communications necessary for managing people. Students will be taught to consider alternatives, advocate for change, and influence policy decisions. Cr 2

 

OTH 621       Level II Fieldwork

This fieldwork requirement is a 12-week, full-time, 40-hours per week supervised experience in an occupational therapy setting, or emerging practice area. Students apply theoretical knowledge and practice skills with clients who are experiencing a variety of disorders, taking on an ever-increasing caseload throughout the 12 weeks. Cr 6

 

SBS 301         Group Dynamics

This course gives students an understanding of how people behave in groups and the skills needed by group members to participate effectively in group activities. It provides a theoretical foundation for how groups function, with focus on group process and development; and it discusses how these theories can be applied to a wide range of group settings. This course uses experiential techniques to help students develop critical skills and understanding of group dynamics. This course is cross-listed with LOS 301. Cr 3

 

SBS 303         Abnormal Psychology

This course presents an introduction to the classification, diagnosis, and etiology of what is considered mental illness. Cultural aspects of abnormality will be emphasized, as will integrative models of the causes of mental disorders. This integrative approach considers the complex interplay between biological, psychological, interpersonal, and cultural factors as they contribute to the development and expression of psychological disorders.  Cr 3

 

SBS 310       Childhood and Society

This course interweaves several broad themes regarding children and childhood in society, including:  how socio-historical circumstances shape our perceptions of children and childhood as a distinct life stage; how various agents of socialization including family, educational systems, and media shape contemporary childhood socialization; how children are co-constructors of childhood and society; how variations in socialization in childhood are shaped by ethnicity, race, class and gender.  Cr 3

 

SBS 329       Research Methods

This course provides an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods which can be used in organizational planning and decision making and in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. The course will cover topic areas related to the application of appropriate methods of inquiry and includes completion of an applied project. Prerequisite: LCC 150. Cr 3

 

SBS 369         Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

SBS 399       Special Topics in SBS: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

Mindfulness is about paying attention without judgment to what is being presented to us in our lives moment by moment right here, right now and then responding to this moment from a place of balance/center rather than reacting from old patterns. In this course we study Mindfulness using practices based on the Kabat-Zinn Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Program and practices based on the work of Professor Nancy Hathaway. After learning these Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction practices, students will explore ways to integrate Mindfulness into work, family, health, and relationships, particularly into Teaching, Nursing, Social Work, Counseling, and the Healthcare Professions.  Cr 3

 

Note:  Because this is a one week intensive course, be prepared to read at least two chapters/night and the remaining chapters during the two weeks following the course. The Take Home Exam Part I will be due on the last day of the week long course, and Take Home Examination Part II will be due at the end of the two weeks following the course postmarked no later than three weeks after the course ends.  Mindfulness Exercises homework will be due each day.

 

SBS 413          Job Search Skills for the 21st Century                                                                                                                                                   

In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 1.5

 

SBS 430         Applied Social Policy

A review of contemporary social policy alternatives and an examination of social policy making processes at both the macro- and micro-levels. Students complete an applied social policy project which might take the form of a policy paper, a grant proposal or written legislative testimony for a community agency. Prerequisites: either LCC 200 or LCC 370 as well as junior standing or permission of the instructor.  Cr 3

 

SBS 447       Internship

This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3-6

 

SCI 170K        Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence in human anatomy and physiology. It introduces basic principles of physiology and anatomy through chemistry, cellular structure and function, genetics, and embryology. This course discusses several physiologic systems including the muscular, skeletal, nervous and integumentary systems. Prerequisites: students should have an understanding of basic biology and chemistry from high school courses or GED. SCI 170 must be taken concurrently with SCI 171. Cr 3

SCI 171K      Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab

Laboratory experiences illustrating topics introduced in SCI 170K.  Must be taken concurrently with SCI 170K.  Cr 1.5

   

SCI 252        Medical Microbiology with Lab

This lecture and laboratory course introduces basic medical microbiology and focuses on the viruses, bacteria, protozoans, and multi-cellular organisms which cause human diseases. It also discusses epidemiology and the immune system. This course meets the requirements of nursing and allied health programs. Prerequisite: SCI 107 or SCI 270/271. Cr 4. 

SCI 270   Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence in human anatomy and physiology. Topics in this course will include the nervous system, special sense organs, blood and circulatory system, immune function, respiratory system, digestion and metabolism, endocrine function, renal function, and electrolyte balance. Prerequisites: SCI 170 and SCI 171. Must be taken concurrently with SCI 271. Cr 3.

 

SCI 271           Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab

Laboratory experiences illustrating topics introduced in SCI 172. Must be taken concurrently with SCI 270. Cr 1.5

 

SBS 369         Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

SBS 413          Job Search Skills for the 21st Century                                                                                                                                                   

In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 1.5

 

SCI 447        Internship

This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr. 3-6