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Fall 2014 Course Schedule Descriptions

 

ANT 101J     Anthropology: The Cultural View

This course is a basic introductory survey of cultural anthropology.  It examines the differences between cultures as well as cultural universals, and the relationship between social organization, ideology, economics, and political structure in different types of societies.  It reviews the various theoretical approaches in cultural anthropology’s attempt to explain human behavior, presenting examples from foraging farming, and contemporary industrial societies through readings and films.  Cr 3

   

CON 280      Holistic Health I

This course explores the realm of holistic health in greater depth. A strong component will focus on approaches to healing, including such topics as nutrition, stress management, meditation, therapeutic movement and massage, music, and others. The primary goal is to bring greater self-confidence, increased knowledge, and self-responsibility about health into each student's life. Cr 3

 

CON 283      Healing & Spirituality

This course will explore the links between spiritual understandings and physical and mental health. Focusing on global spiritual and religious traditions, the course will examine the determinants of health and the healing techniques utilized in each faith. We will also examine the ways in which religious values and expectations become internalized and affect the ways in which we interpret our wellness and our discomforts.          This course is designed to offer an opportunity to become familiar with the world’s faith traditions, and to explore spirituality as it relates to healing, both personally and institutionally. Cr 3

 

CON 302      Pharmacology

This course provides an overview of the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The major drug categories are reviewed with emphasis placed on the therapeutic use, action, and adverse reactions of selected prototype drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits and risks of drug therapy, thereby preparing the health professional for safe, therapeutic pharmacologic interventions. There is no clinical component to CON 302. For nursing majors concurrent or semester preceding NUR 323/325. Prerequisites: BIO 211 or SCI 172 and junior standing. Cr 3

 

CON 356      Concepts in Community Health

This course introduces the concepts and principles basic to the development and maintenance of the community’s health. The epidemiological process guides the survey of current major health issues. The course focuses on the health issues of groups in the community at local, state,    national, and global levels. Pre-requisite: must be taken concurrent with or previous to NUR 341. Cr 3

 

ECE 399       Topics: Science in Early Childhood Education

 

EDU 670       Intro to Educational Leadership

This course is designed to be the first course taken in the educational leadership program which may lead to certification as a principal, special education director, or curriculum coordinator. The course has two major foci: the characteristics of good leadership and the skills of effective educational leadership. Since many students who enroll in this course are exploring a career transition into administration, a goal of the course is to give participants a clear understanding of the decisions faced by educational leaders, the skills and knowledge necessary to perform effectively, and to give participants an opportunity to explore strategies for balancing the demands of the job, personal commitments, and responsibilities. Cr 3

 

HCE 510       Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling and Services

This course will provide an orientation to the counseling profession, focusing on rehabilitation concepts, services, and settings. Included will be: history, trends, and related legislation; critical components of the rehabilitation process; contemporary counselor roles and functions; professional education, associations, standards, and credentials; ethical and legal issues; technology issues and practices; and rehabilitation agencies and services. Field visits and the examination of rehabilitation services from various participant perspectives will be required.  Cr 3

 

HCE 611       Medical & Psychological Aspects: Disability & Rehabilitation

This course explores the medical and psychological issues surrounding the concepts of disability and rehabilitation. Particular emphasis will be given to examining: a) the medical model as an organizing framework for viewing disability and rehabilitation; b) the diagnoses and treatment of various physical, developmental, sensory, and emotional conditions; c) the perspectives and responses of people with    disabilities toward their diagnosed conditions and prescribed treatments; d) the principles and practice of functional assessment; and e) the ethical issues surrounding medical and rehabilitation services. Also examined will be psychological explanations of disability, their applications, and their implications for rehabilitation practice. A primary focus throughout the course will be on highlighting the perspectives that people with disabilities hold toward their life situations as well as the medical and rehabilitation settings and professionals they encounter.

 

HCE 686       Internship: Counselor Education

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate formal coursework with on-the-job experience in selected institutions. Prerequisite: HCE 690.  Cr 1-15

 

HCE 690       Individual Counseling Practicum Seminar

Through lecture, discussion, and group supervision students learn to apply professional knowledge and skills to the practice of counseling with individuals. Role playing, video and audio tapes, and demonstrations are used in helping students develop an integrated counseling style. This course is taken concurrently with HCE 691. Prerequisites: HCE 620, HCE 621, HCE 622 (school counseling specialty only), and HCE 626.  Cr 3

 

HON 299         Honors Topics: Caging Picasso/Staging Woolf

This course explores the tools and strategies important in the interpretation of literature and the arts and encourages an appreciation of the role of literature and the arts in social, political, and cultural life. It promotes understanding of and appreciation for the creative expression of shared cultural beliefs in various historical periods of cultures around the world and examines literature and the arts as potential critiques of culture. Co-curricular opportunities are included.  Students without prior honors credits are encouraged to contact the USM Honors Office for permission to enroll. Prerequisites: Any EYE Course and Honors student.  Cr 3

 

HRD 200         Multicultural Human Development              

This course introduces developmental theory and research that encompasses the entire lifespan. Emphasis will be on prenatal development through adolescence, with an overview of adult development. A multi-disciplinary and multicultural view of human development will be taken by examining theories from a socio-cultural context and in consideration of change as well as stability throughout the life cycle. The interaction of hereditary, environmental, and socio-cultural factors will be considered in studying physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. Prerequisite: Second semester freshmen or above; must have completed College Writing and EYE course.   Cr 3

 

HUM 105F     Basic Photography

This course is an introduction to black and white photography, designed to help students gain understanding through “hands-on” photographic work. Lectures include classroom discussions concerning the history and aesthetics of photography, and techniques include camera and lens functions, exposure methods, basic black and white film processing, printmaking, print finishing, and presentation techniques.  Cr 3

 

HUM 125      French Language and Maine Society

This is an introductory course for the French language. Students will also learn about the cultural and linguistic context of French society in Maine and eastern North America. Students will use the French language they are studying to work with the Franco-American Collection and Maine Franco-American communities.  Cr 3

 

HUM 201      Creative Writing: Cultivating Your Inner Muse

This course is designed to help students hone their creative strategies and inspire them to commit to the practice of writing. We will explore the practical implications of creative expression. In addition to investigating the genres of fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry, students will identify and devise an approach to writing that works for them. This course is appropriate for novices and experienced writers alike and will include discussions of readings and traditional workshop response to students' writing. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr 3

 

HUM 300      Literary and Cultural Theory and Practice

This course explores the relationships among writers, texts, and readers, each shaping and shaped by the others. The aim of this course is to introduce key concepts and critical terms of contemporary literary and cultural theory. Students learn to put these theories into practice. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English.  Cr 3

 

HUM 301      French North America

This is an interdisciplinary course designed to help develop an appreciation for the richness of French society throughout our continent.  We will review Franco-American history, geography, and social issues, as well as the local, regional, and continental visions of French North America.  One of the hallmarks of French America is Métis sage - the mixing of ethnic heritages; therefore, an important outcome of this course will be an appreciation for wider issues of diversity.  Cr 3

 

HUM 316         New Digital Media Literacies: Self-Fashioning and Critiquing Information

Students investigate, critique, and engage in a range of experiments to discover how new media radically change both thinking and language, as visual material, writing, and technology interplay online to form new, hybridic modes of reading and writing, teaching and learning. Drawing from such diverse fields as literature, geography, and education, areas covered include digital Shakespeare, the internet as a utopia, and a video game field study to explore multi-modal thinking. Prerequisites:  College Writing (LCC 110/111) and Critical Thinking (LCC 200) with a C or better. Cr 3

 

HUM 325      World History & Geography I

This is the first in a series of two courses that are designed to help students develop an understanding of and an appreciation for world history and geography. The course's goal is to provide students with a humanistic background from which to better comprehend global complexities. This course will cover the period from prehistory to the age of modern expansion, from about 50,000 to 500 years ago.  Prerequisite: Only students with more than 45 credits are permitted to take this course. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr 3

 

HUM 345      Leadership and Film

Like literature, film allows for an exploration of various themes and experiences that would not normally be available to an individual.  This course seeks to capture this opportunity by seeking to understand leadership as it is presented in various films.  Through the use of film, we will explore themes relating to leadership such as power, influence, oppression, ethics, service, and more.  Cr 3

 

HUM 349         Trauma and Narrative

This course examines the medical, political, and cultural history of the concept of trauma, focusing on how trauma has become a core concern in both contemporary clinical psychology and literary criticism. We consider models for conceptualizing responses to traumatic experiences. Topics include the diagnostic criteria of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, recommended treatment approaches, risk and protective factors.  Students explore narrative vs. traumatic memories and carefully examine a number of literary texts and films to analyze the characteristics of representations of traumatic memory.  The idea that fashioning a narrative of traumatic experience is essential to trauma therapy and to the healing effects of trauma literature, will also be explored. Cr. 3

 

HUM 369        Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles  

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

HUM 385      Global Past, Global Present

This course is a thematic survey of global history from its origins to the present. Its aim is to provide a wide contextualized understanding of human existence in a new format that is called Big History a concept that integrates knowledge from the natural and social sciences with the humanities. The result is a more realistic understanding of how humans fit into the vast expanse of the universe. As a part of this survey, students will consider some of the challenges of modern globalization, with an important theme being the quest to develop sustainable and ethical lifestyles. The overall focus of this course will be on what such knowledge might mean in everyday life and how we as responsible individuals and a responsible species should conduct ourselves in this world.  Cr 3

 

HUM 413        Job Search Skills for the 21st Century

In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

HUM 447         Internship                                                                                                                                                                                                This course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413.   Cr 3-6.

 

LAC 112       Microsoft Excel

This course uses a problem-solving approach to electronic spreadsheets. It satisfies the LOS major’s requirement and should follow the LAC 150 introductory course. Students will learn advanced data analysis, formulas, and create graphs to interpret the data. This course should be completed prior to taking the financial management, economics, or budgeting course. Prerequisite: LAC 150 or equivalent.  Cr 1

LAC 114       PowerPoint

This computer program allows users an electronic means of giving presentations to groups of people Students will learn how to create electronic slides using written, graphic, and sound materials. The slides can then be formatted in several different ways: 35 mm slides, overhead transparencies, and handouts. Students who have to give presentations to classes or who are considering careers in teaching, marketing, or public relations fields should consider this course.  Cr 1

 

LAC 180         Academic Self Management

This learning strategy course explores the six major control components that usually contribute to high academic achievement: motivation, methods of learning, use of time, monitoring of performance factors, and relationships to both physical and social environment. Presentations and readings involving learning research and theory are interconnected to student participation, assessment, and self-monitoring activities. Students will engage in the self-management and self-prescriptive process to determine what specific academic behaviors will best assist individual academic performance. Students must be registered in at least one other college course in order to provide an application-practice field. Cr 3

 

LAC 200         Community Learning Groups

This specially designed course for TRiO Student Support Services participants serves as a module in a series which will enhance the learning experience at USM and prepare the student to focus on personal and academic goals. Topics will vary, but will include self-assessments for career and learning, study strategies, making the most of academic advising, taking full advantage of university offerings, financial literacy, leadership and diversity development, and planning for careers or graduate school. The instructor's role will be to serve as advisor and guide, and in addition, there will be guest speaker experts in some classes. The content will change each semester, and TRiO students can take the course multiple times, as it is an important anchor to the program. Please note that only TRiO Student Support Services students at USM are permitted to register and enroll in this course.  Cr 1

 

LAE 200       Education in the U.S. with Field Experience

This course combines an introduction to the study of education in the United States and the examination of its historical perspectives.  The course introduces the student to the relationship between schools and society while developing the student's personal philosophy of education.  A two-and-a-half hour per week field experience component allows the student to acquire a better understanding of the teaching profession in a school setting.  Cr. 4

 

LAE 320       Applied Skills of Teaching and Learning

This course introduces students to current research in the field of learning theory and practice and presents various ways of knowing and teaching including neurological brain based learning theories, multiple intelligence theory, perceptual perspectives, emotional and social intelligence theories, and differentiated instruction.  Students will learn how to motivate students and structure learning experiences with best practices.  A major focus is how students develop concepts and build knowledge through exemplary lesson and unit planning and delivery, including the curricular, instructional, and assessment choices educators make.  Other foci will include classroom management and teacher-student interactions. The overall goal of the course is to help create educational leaders with a basic knowledge of educational theory and related best practices, who have the potential to transform educational practice in the field of learning and teaching. Cr 4

 

LAE 399       Topics:  Science in Early Childhood Education

 

LAE 402       Teaching English in Grades 7-12

This course focuses on ways to organize and teach English classes at the middle school and high school levels based upon current research in literacy and national and state standards in English Language Arts. Various strategies involved in designing and managing a student centered literacy program will be presented. Different theories for teaching English will serve as a backdrop for creating classroom activities that connect the literature to the students' lives. The writing process and the reading-writing connection will be emphasized to assess and enhance both literacy and learning. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM's teacher education programs. Cr 3

 

LAE 404         Teaching Social Studies in Grades 7-12

This course is designed to prepare students for best practices in 7-12 social studies instruction. Students will understand the goals of secondary social studies education, as well as the guiding principles and strands of the discipline. The course framework is built on the CCSSO's Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards and the 7-12 strands of the Maine Learning Results for Social Studies. Students will learn how to promote diverse children's proficiency in state standards by implementing multiple strategies. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM's teacher education programs. Cr 3

 

LAE 405         Teaching Mathematics in Grades K-8

This course, intended for those preparing to be K-8 teachers, provides experiences to develop, critique, and apply knowledge, skills, and research findings in mathematics, pedagogy, and mathematical learning theory in elementary and middle school classrooms. Major areas of focus include learning and assessment of all children, instruction to support all students' mathematical understanding, reasoning, communication, and collaboration; standards (national, state, and local); content integration; resources; issues; and the discipline's philosophical framework. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM's teacher education programs. Cr 3

 

LAE 411         Internship in English in Grades 7-12

This internship is in conjunction with LAE 402 and allows the student to complete assignments graded in class. These include: videotaped teaching and reflection lessons, professional stance, and final exhibition review: portfolio development.  Cr. 3

LAE 412         Internship in Social Studies in Grades 7-12

This internship is in conjunction with LAE 404 and allows the student to complete assignments graded in class. These include: videotaped teaching and reflection lessons, professional stance, and final exhibition review: portfolio development.  Cr 3

 

LAE 452         Teaching Science in Grades K-8

This course has an interactive laboratory and field-based approach that models the teaching and learning of science at the elementary and middle school levels. The emphasis is on content, process, and methodology. The course framework is built on the CCSSO's Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards, the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T), and the Maine State Standards for Science and Technology with specific attention to the K-8 grade level strands. Students will learn how to promote diverse children's proficiency in state standards by implementing multiple strategies to support scientific understanding of systems in the natural and designed world. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM's teacher education programs. Cr 3

 

LCC 110       College Writing: Language and Literacies

This entry-phase, first-tier writing instruction course introduces students to one or more themes of the Core curriculum. It emphasizes the connections between reading and writing, and students learn how thinking and the language that conveys it develop and change through the process of drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. The course introduces students to the conventions of expository academic writing and links to co-curricular activities of the Core. Cr 3

 

LCC 123        College and Community I

This entry phase course introduces students to the promise and possibilities of USM LAC's interdisciplinary, writing-intensive, and student-centered culture. Students will consider the relevance the four themes of the Lewiston Common Core (justice, sustainability, democracy and difference) have to their future lives. Students link their own "stories" -- what has brought them to this point in their personal, academic, and professional lives -- with the habits of mind needed for success in college, career, and global citizenship. Cr 3

 

LCC 150       Statistics for Informed Decision Making

This course introduces and applies quantitative analyses to address real world questions. It applies descriptive statistics, sampling and significance testing, correlation, and regression analysis to issues related to the four themes of the Core. The course provides the opportunity to interpret and analyze statistical decision making, and identifies data misconceptions and misuses. Cr 3

 

LCC 200       Creative Critical Inquiry

This writing instruction course introduces students to criteria for identifying and constructing well-reasoned arguments, fosters the discovery and use of students' critical/analytical voice in their writing, and develops skills for incorporating, interpreting and integrating the views of others. It provides the opportunity to refine critical thinking abilities by analyzing everyday life experience, including how culture shapes our sense of reality and ourselves. The course highlights the importance of generating good questions and tolerating ambiguity when seeking to understand complex issues. Prerequisite: College Writing.

 

LCC 220       U.S. Democracy:  Origins and Development

In this course, students consider the convergence of cultures, events, and ideas that led to the founding of the United States as a republic up to c. 1877.  The course explores the basic structure of the U.S. system of government, the primary political philosophies that support it, and past efforts made to remedy injustices that ran counter to the ideals of democracy.  Cr 3

 

LCC 230       Environmental Science, Policy, & Sustainability with Lab

This course presents a multidisciplinary survey of the scientific principles underlying energy utilization, nutrient cycles, global warming, population, and natural resource policy and management. The lectures will be comprised of Socratic interactions and group discussions relating regional, national and global components that encompass ecology, economics, politics, and social endeavors.  This course includes a laboratory involving field and lab work and service learning efforts.  Cr 4

 

LCC 250       Thinking About Art; Thinking Through Art

This course explores the tools and strategies important in the interpretation of literature and the arts and encourages an appreciation of the role of literature and the arts in social, political, and cultural life. It promotes understanding of and appreciation for the creative expression of shared cultural beliefs in various historical periods of cultures around the world and examines literature and the arts as potential critiques of culture. Co-curricular opportunities are included, especially in connection or conjunction with the Atrium Gallery.  Cr 3

 

LCC 370         Toward a Global Ethics

This writing instruction course assists students in articulating and assessing their own values. It examines the range of ethical theories and positions and explores the influence of particular cultural ideologies on ethical beliefs. The course considers the ethical principles implied by democracy, sustainability, justice, and difference. It examines ethical issues and dilemmas faced by individuals, organizations, and nations while exploring personal and collective decision-making processes in a global context. Prerequisite: Core Area C.  Cr 4

 

LCC 480       Senior Seminar

This course provides writing instruction experience for students from LAC's four degree programs.  Students complete a major research and writing project addressing one of the four themes of the Common Core from an interdisciplinary approach. Prerequisite: ENG 100C or LCC 110C; LCC 200E or LCC 370E; HUM 300, and LOS 300 OR SBS 320. Cr 3

 

LOS 250       Organizational Accounting

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of accounting that they will need to understand financial processes in private, public, and not-for-profit organizations.  Cr 3

 

LOS 299       Writing in the Major

Students majoring in LOS are required to register for this course simultaneously with their registration in LOS 300 Organizational Theory.  It meets for an hour per week of writing instruction for the LOS major.  Cr 1

 

LOS 300       Organizational Theory

This is a foundational course that provides a solid overview of organizational theories in leadership. Current organizational issues are analyzed using structural, human resource, cultural, and political frameworks and the case method. Issues examined include leadership, organizational design, planning, change, decision making, communication, and control. This is an excellent course for students interested in how organizations work. Students in the LOS major must complete this required course with a grade of a B- or better as a condition of their degree. This course includes writing instruction. Prerequisite: familiarity with the Blackboard online learning community. Completion of College Writing with a C or better is required for LOS majors and preferred for all other students. Cr 3

 

LOS 301       Group Dynamics

This course gives students an understanding of how people behave in groups and the skills needed by group members to participate effectively in group activities. It provides a theoretical foundation for how groups function, with focus on group process and development; and it discusses how these theories can be applied to a wide range of group settings. This course uses experiential techniques to help students develop critical skills and understanding of group dynamics.  Cr 3

 

LOS 302         Organizational Behavior

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with interpersonal dynamics and the tools to make organizational interactions more effective. Through assessments, exercises, and discussions, students will examine how perceptions of self and others influence people's behavior in a variety of situations. As good communication is critical in building sound interpersonal relationships, students will have many opportunities to fine-tune writing and speaking skills.  Cr 3

  

LOS 308 Lean Methods & Systems

This is an introductory course in applying lean principles and methods in organizations, including front/back office manufacturing, non-profits, healthcare, IT, education, and government.  Students will learn basic lean principles and methods and have an opportunity to observe, practice, and apply principles and methods learned. Cr. 3

 

LOS 312       Human Resources Management

This course focuses on the procedures and processes associated with the management of human resources within organizations. Topics include recruitment, staff development, job analysis, personnel systems, and training.  Cr 3

 

LOS 323       The Media and Politics

This course explores the implications of political campaigns in American politics. Topics include management of campaigns, candidate recruitment, positive and negative advertising, political consultants, political parties and interest groups, effects of media coverage, campaign  financing, and impact of campaigns and elections on public policy. Special consideration will be given to current campaigns.

 

LOS 329       Research Methods

This course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods which can be used in organizational planning and decision making and in the social and behavioral sciences. The course will cover topic areas related to the application of appropriate methods of inquiry and includes completion of an applied project. Strongly recommended for students going on to graduate school, careers in consulting, or human resource management.  Cross listed with SBS 329.  Prerequisite: LCC 150D.  Cr 3

 

LOS 333         Portfolio Development

This Portfolio Development course is offered to the adult learner who is preparing a competency based, experiential, academic portfolio, documenting their college-level knowledge, competencies, and abilities. This course supports students in improving the skills and knowledge needed to document and communicate their prior learning in the area of leadership and organizational studies. At the end of the course, students submit a completed academic portfolio for assessment to USM¿s Office of Prior Learning for possible additional credits.  Prerequisites:  College writing or the equivalent, leadership LOS 350 either concurrently or completed, resume submission, and subsequent permission by instructor.  Cr 3

LOS 345         Leadership and Film

Like literature, film allows for an exploration of various themes and experiences that would not normally be available to an individual.  This course seeks to capture this opportunity by seeking to understand leadership as it is presented in various films.  Through the use of film, we will explore themes relating to leadership such as power, influence, oppression, ethics, service, and more.  Cr 3

 

LOS 350       Leadership

This foundational course for students of leadership will provide learners with a review of major leadership concepts and theories designed to incorporate research findings, practice, skill-building, and direct application to real world scenarios. Beyond leadership concepts and theories, the course will cover a variety of topics impacting today's leaders as a foundation for learning including power and ethics, leadership development, politics and influence, decision making, and creativity and innovation. An experiential design is used along with traditional online techniques to help students reflect on their personal leadership styles and examine their approaches to leading others in diverse organizational settings. Students in the LOS major must complete this required course with a grade of a B- or better as a condition of their degree. Completion of College Writing with a C or better is required for LOS majors and preferred for all other students. Cr 3.

 

LOS 369         Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

LOS 413         Job Search Skills in the 21st Century

In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

LOS 440         Organizational Change and Development

This course explores the theory, research, and processes of leading, managing, and adapting to organizational change. Case studies and experiential learning are used to examine the effectiveness of change efforts and their impact on the group and individual.  Prerequisite: LOS 300 or permission of instructor. LOS 329 or equivalent is also encouraged.  Cr 3

LOS 447         Internship

This course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413.   Cr 3-6.

 

LOS 500       Foundations of Leadership I

The course provides an overview of leadership theory and intellectual history using disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches from philosophy, social science, the humanities (e.g., literature and history), and science. We explore the wealth of interpretive frameworks for leadership with the task of increasing our understanding of this complex and multifaceted phenomenon. The study of leadership can be applied across disciplinary fields and to examine critical issues emerging today. Questions considered include: Are leaders different from followers? What are the ends of leadership? What sort of leadership is needed today?  Cr 3

 

LOS 550       Cultural Contexts

This course provides an analysis of the role that culture and cultural differences play in contemporary occupational, social/civic, and interpersonal life. The essential question for the course is: how does one show leadership in creating and supporting multicultural relationships, organizations, institutions, and socio-political and economic systems? Cr 3

 

LOS 611       Communication and Relationship Building

This course investigates the communication and behavioral theories and techniques that mediate interpersonal dynamics. Students will engage in a course of study designed to help them develop awareness of their communication abilities and difficulties and tools to effectively address the interpersonal challenges they face now and will face in the future.  Cr 3

 

LOS 631         Leadership and Film

Like literature, film allows for an exploration of various themes and experiences that would not normally be available to an individual.  This course seeks to capture this opportunity by seeking to understand leadership as it is presented in various films.  Through the use of film, we will explore themes relating to leadership such as power, influence, oppression, ethics, service, and more.  Cr 3

 

LOS 688       Capstone Seminar (Instructor Perm Required)

The seminar allows students the opportunity to work with faculty to develop their master’s project or thesis. Seminar meetings will include collegial (student) as well as faculty critique and assistance in developing research and projects. Questions posed by both projects and theses will be discussed. The capstone advisor must approve all projects. The capstone advisor and, when appropriate, an outside reader in an area of concentration must approve thesis topics. The seminar will conclude with students identifying the key questions for their continued study of leadership.  Cr 3

designed to produce an article of interest for the field of leadership studies. With a thesis advisor, the student will identify an appropriate professional or academic outlet for publication, and the paper will be prepared and submitted to this outlet. Students will formally present their theses to students, community members, and LAC faculty. Students will be evaluated on both their verbal and written presentation skills.   Cr 3

 

MAT 009       Developmental Mathematics

This course emphasizes arithmetic computations and informal geometry. Some of the topics included are elementary number theory, operations with fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, percents, signed numbers, data interpretation, and introduction and preparation for algebra. Credits for this course do not fulfill degree requirements. Minimum grade of "C" to go on to the next course.  Cr 3

 

MAT 101       College Readiness Math

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to master the knowledge and develop skills to ensure success in subsequent math courses.  Cr 4

 

MAT 108       College Algebra

Building on the foundation of algebra skills expected of all students meeting admission requirements, this course reviews basic algebraic operations and the general concepts of sets, relations, functions (polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential), and their graphs.  Methods of solving equations and inequalities, as well as systems of equations, will be stressed.  Additional topics may include matrices, determinants, permutations, combinations, sequences, and mathematical induction.  Prerequisite:  successful completion of the mathematics proficiency requirement and a passing grade on an algebra competency test which will be administered at the first class meeting.  Cr 4

 

MAT 152       Calculus A

The first course in a three-semester sequence covering basic calculus of real variables, Calculus introduces the concept of limit and applies it to the definition of derivative and integral of a function of one variable. The rules of differentiation and properties of the integral are emphasized, as well as applications of the derivative and integral. This course will usually include an introduction to the transcendental functions and some use of a computer algebra system. Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra plus geometry and trigonometry, or MAT 140D.  Cr 4

 

MPH 425         American Health System

Introduces students to the organization, financing, and management of the American healthcare and public health systems and the dynamic changes that are affecting health organizations as a result of market-based and policy forces.  Students develop an understanding of: (1) the key components of healthcare and public health, (2)  how organizations and systems are financed, regulated, and managed in a dynamic market and policy environment, (3) the changing role of population health and public health systems, and (4) the efficiency, effectiveness and equity of health services.  Cr 3

 

MPH 525         American Health System

Introduces students to the organization, financing, and management of the American healthcare and public health systems and the dynamic changes that are affecting health organizations as a result of market-based and policy forces.  Students develop an understanding of: (1) the key components of healthcare and public health, (2)  how organizations and systems are financed, regulated, and managed in a dynamic market and policy environment, (3) the changing role of population health and public health systems, and (4) the efficiency, effectiveness and equity of health services.  Cr 3

 

NUR 300         Health Assessment

This course provides knowledge and skills essential to conduct in-depth bio-psycho-social-cultural health assessment of well individuals throughout the life span. Emphasis is placed on data collection through effective communication and physical skills followed by data analysis and identification of nursing diagnoses. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I and II, NUR 100 and a GPA of 2.75.  Cr 3

   

NUR 301         Health Assessment Lab

This laboratory course provides knowledge and skills essential to conduct an in-depth bio-psycho-social-cultural, holistic health assessment of well individuals through the life span. Emphasis is placed on data collection through development of communication and physical examination skills. Data will then be analyzed and nursing diagnoses developed. Concurrent with NUR 300. Cr 2

 

NUR 306         Nursing Arts and Science

This course introduces the student to concepts and skills basic to the art and science of nursing. The nursing process is introduced as a problem-solving tool, and is used along with scientific principles in the teaching of foundational nursing therapeutics used in most practice settings. Prerequisites: 24 credits, a GPA of 2.75, and Anatomy and Physiology I and II (or concurrent).  Cr 3

 

NUR 307         Fundamentals of Nursing Lab

This course focuses on the cognitive basis, scientific principles, and manipulative component of psychomotor skills used when implementing foundational nursing therapeutics, which promote, maintain, and restore the health of the client. Concurrent with NUR 212.  Cr 2

 

NUR 339       Community Nursing Partnership I

This is the first in a four-course series (NUR 339, NUR 341, NUR 439, and NUR 441).  Over the course of four semesters, students will engage in partnership with a specific community.  This sequence of courses incorporates the concepts of partnership building, risk identification, and health promotion within a community-based context.  Students will collaborate with community partners to develop an understanding of both short- and long-term needs of the community.  Problem posing and problem solving will come from the community.  Students will engage in ongoing community assessment, support communities in developing long-term interventions and approaches, and engage in evaluation of community level practice.  Students will identify individuals and families within their communities who would benefit from individual and family-based nursing assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation.  Students will work with health care providers in these communities to assess the need for, and to augment, the services available.  Students will engage in both formative and cumulative evaluation over the course of their interaction with the community.  Students will consider issues of continuation and termination as they work with individuals, families, fellow students, and community partners over a two-year period.  Advancing students will mentor entering students in the roles of community partner, advocate, and care provider.  Prerequisite or concurrently: CON 356.  Instructor permission required.  Cr 2

 

NUR 341       Community Nursing Partnership II

This is the second in a three-course series.  See NUR 339 for description.  Prerequisite: NUR 339.  Instructor permission required.  Cr 2

 

NUR 421       Reproductive and Sexual Health Nursing

This course focuses on the theory and research in reproductive and sexual health care. While emphasis is placed on holistic nursing care of diverse healthy families from preconception through the childbearing process, high risk conditions, including end of life care for neonates, and the interventions necessary for successful adaptation are also discussed. Male and female reproductive health issues and nursing care across the lifespan will be presented. Prerequisite: NUR 323/325 or 523/542.  Cr 3Cr 3

 

NUR 427       Child Health Nursing

In this course, students examine family-centered nursing care in the health promotion and health care of children. Class discussions focus on theories, research, and literature related to health needs and common health problems of children. Family, heredity, environment, and socioeconomics are among the factors examined in discussions of nursing in child health. Prerequisites: NUR 323/325 or 523/542.   Cr 3

 

OTH 501       Occupational Therapy Foundations

This course introduces students to the profession of occupational therapy by studying its history, philosophy, and standards. Students will examine the socioeconomic and political factors that influence the practice, professional behaviors, responsibilities of practitioners, and occupational choice. Additionally, students will learn about the role and functions of OT practitioners; local, national, and international associations; the OT process; activity and occupational analysis; OTR and OTA collaboration; and the culture of disability.  Cr 4

 

OTH 502         Introduction to Occupation

Introduces students to the theory of occupation and the relationship between occupation and occupational therapy practice. Students will develop an appreciation of the complexity of occupations across the life span by observing and analyzing a variety of occupations on and off campus. Clinical reasoning theory will be taught and practiced as part of the analysis.  Cr 3

 

OTH 503       The Reflective Practitioner

Provides an understanding of human behavior; therapeutic use of self; and development of interpersonal communication both personally and

professionally. The implications of cultural diversity on communication style will be addressed.  Cr 2

 

OTH 510       Level I Fieldwork: Physical Dysfunction

This course provides fieldwork experience as a participant/ observer in the practice area of adults with physical dysfunction. The format for the weekly seminars will be a mix of discussion of fieldwork experiences, further investigation into material presented in concurrent semester courses, an opportunity to meet with clinicians and clients/consumers, and a forum for discussing issues related to evidence- based practice. The combination of direct fieldwork experience plus an integrated seminar allows students to further integrate classroom and clinical knowledge.  Prerequisites and co-requisites: OTH 508, OTH 601, OTH 603.  Cr 1

 

OTH 512       Applied Research II

This course provides the opportunity for students to expand their application of research concepts to the investigation of an occupational therapy question, need, or evaluation of occupational therapy practice. Students will conduct a research project, collecting and analyzing data, culminating in a full esearch paper and presentation. Course sessions and assignments will be devoted to guiding students through the research process. Cr 3.

 

OTH 513       Applied Concepts of Movement

This course will cover the basic science needed to understand normal body movement. The student will gain an understanding of the functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and how it relates to the biomechanics, kinematics, and kinetics of human motion. In addition, the student will learn skills in assessment of musculoskeletal functioning from a biomechanical frame of reference. The course will include hands-on laboratory experiences that will facilitate the learning of concepts and skills. It will also include the examination of medical terminology. Co-requisite: OTH 514.  Cr 3

 

OTH 514      Human Anatomy: Structure and Function

This course provides an in-depth study of the structure and function of the systems of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on the neuro, skeletal, and muscular systems. Labwork will consist of independent study with models, CD-ROM, and online programs.  Cr 4

 

OTH 518       Group Process in Practice

This 2-credit course introduces students to group process principles, including the major characteristics of groups, group norms, and group

development.  Students will have an opportunity to lead a group as well as apply the group process to multiple areas of practice.  Cr 2

 

OTH 603       Occupational Performance through Adulthood

This course integrates occupational therapy theory and practice in the occupations of adults with physical impairments. This class meets three times a week for three hours each session. This format provides students with an opportunity to apply occupational therapy and new knowledge to clinical cases, develop clinical reasoning abilities, and learn hands-on skills needed for entry-level practice. Learning areas involve applying the OT practice framework to practice as well as integrating OT in a variety of practice settings with a variety of team members. Written and verbal skills are highlighted, and role playing/modeling of interdisciplinary teamwork is stressed. It is expected that students are able to do professional research by accessing information on the Internet via relevant databases. Prerequisites and co-requisites: student is matriculated into the M.O.T. program, and has successfully completed OTH 510 and OTH 514, or is currently taking OTH 601 and OTH 614.  Cr 7

 

OTH 614       Adult Conditions

Medical conditions and diagnoses for adults with physical dysfunction will be addressed. Emphasis will be on understanding medical conditions as they relate to occupational therapy practice. Prerequisites or co-requisites: OTH 510, OTH 601, OTH 603.  Cr 2

 

OTH 621       Level II Fieldwork

This fieldwork requirement is a 12-week, full-time, 40-hours per week supervised experience in an occupational therapy setting, or emerging practice area. Students apply theoretical knowledge and practice skills with clients who are experiencing a variety of disorders, taking on an ever-increasing caseload throughout the 12 weeks. Cr 6

 

PSY 101          General Psychology I

An introduction to the study of behavior as a natural science.  Among the topics covered are: method of inquiry, physiological foundations of behavior, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, learning and thinking.  This course is a prerequisite for all courses in the department.  Cr 3

 

PSY 102       General Psychology II

A continuation of Psychology 101J. It deals with complex psychological processes such as ability testing, personality, conflict, behavior disorders and therapy, and social and industrial behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 101J.  Cr 3

 

SBS 200         Multicultural Human Development

This course introduces developmental theory and research that encompasses the entire life span. Emphasis will be on prenatal development through adolescence, with an overview of adult development. A multi-disciplinary and multicultural view of human development will be taken by examining theories from a socio-cultural context and in consideration of change as well as stability throughout the lifecycle. The interaction of hereditary, environmental, and socio-cultural factors will be considered in studying physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. Prerequisites: Second semester freshmen or above; must have completed College Writing and, for students using course for USM Core in Portland and Gorham, an EYE course. This course is cross-listed with HRD 200 and satisfies USM Core area: Socio-Cultural Analysis. Cr 3

 

SBS 209       Human Genetics

This course examines the role of heredity in human growth, development, and behavior.  Decision making, ethical issues and societal responsibilities related to genetic disorders will be discussed.   Prerequisites:  SCI 100K or SCI 107K/SCI 171K. Cross-listed with SCI 209.

 

SBS 300       Deviance & Social Control

The course examines the historical and relative notion of deviance and the nature and type(s) of social control.  Cr 3

SBS 300       Deviance & Social Control (Blended)

The course examines the historical and relative notion of deviance and the nature and type(s) of social control.  Cr 3

 

This is a "Blended" course which means it is 50% or more on-line.  Exact meeting dates will be posted as soon as they are finalized.

SBS 301       Group Dynamics

This course is designed to give students an understanding of how people behave in groups and the skills needed by group members to participate effectively in group activities. It provides a theoretical foundation in how groups function, with focus on group process and development; and it discusses how these theories can be applied to a wide range of group settings. This course uses experiential techniques to help students develop critical skills and understanding of group dynamics.  This course is cross-listed with LOS 301.  Cr 3

 

SBS 302       Organizational Behavior

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with interpersonal dynamics and the tools to make organizational interactions more effective. Through assessments, exercises, and discussions, students will examine how perceptions of self and others influence people’s behavior in a variety of situations.  As good communication is critical in building sound interpersonal relationships, students will have many opportunities to fine tune writing and speaking skills.  This course is cross-listed with LOS 302.  Cr 3

 

SBS 303         Abnormal Psychology

This course presents an introduction to the classification, diagnosis, and etiology of what is considered mental illness. Cultural aspects of abnormality will be emphasized, as will integrative models of the causes of mental disorders. This integrative approach considers the complex interplay between biological, psychological, interpersonal, and cultural factors as they contribute to the development and expression of psychological disorders.  Cr 3

 

SBS 311       Theories of Personality

This course is an in-depth study of the major theories of personality.  It includes consideration of historical developments and cultural differences in the area of personality theory and research.  The specific understanding of psychopathology contained in the theories will also be explored.  Cr 3

 

SBS 315         Social Psychology of Disability

This course will examine some of the social psychological issues associated with disability and the rehabilitation of individuals who have disabilities, with a focus on minimizing existing social, vocational, educational, and attitudinal barriers to individuals rather than on minimizing the impact of clients' physical/mental differences within a normed environment. It will familiarize students with the points of view and the experiences of people from various social, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds with a wide range of disabilities/abilities, towards enabling students to approach counseling as a means of expanding opportunities for their clients' access to these opportunities, and empowering their clients to attain their goals. 

 

SBS 316       Diversity in the Workplace

Using historical, socio-economic, and psychological perspectives, students will learn about the challenges diverse members of U.S. society, such as women, people of color, people from marginalized classes, and those from other countries, have had and continue to face. Students will gain an understanding of how the workplace may affect diverse peoples and how others can learn to make the workplace more hospitable. A primary focus of this course will be on examining beliefs, behaviors, or unconscious attitudes that perpetuate the oppression and subordination of diverse members of society in the workplace, while also looking at how increased diversity is adding to workplace productivity, creativity, and learning. Readings are drawn from the social sciences and humanities to provide an interdisciplinary approach to the topic.  Cr 3

 

SBS 329       Research Methods

This course provides an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods which can be used in organizational planning and decision making and in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. The course will cover topic areas related to the application of appropriate methods of inquiry and includes completion of an applied project. Prerequisite: LCC 150. Cr 3. 

 

SBS 335       Legal Issues in Health and Human Services

This course examines the legal framework underlying the delivery of health and human services with an emphasis on current socio-legal problems including the rights of clients and the responsibilities of workers.  Cr 3

 

SBS 336         Introduction to Public Health

This course provides an overview of the public health system and examines the purpose, history, organization, approach, functions and determinants of health.  The course places special emphasis on current health issues from our daily lives to highlight the relevance of public health.  Cr 3

 

SBS 341       The Family

A contemporary approach to the study of the family.  Includes an examination of family structures, familial relationships, and the impact of social and psychological change on these structures and relationships.  Cr 3

 

SBS 343       Substance Abuse

This course considers patterns of use of drugs, the bases of their effects and associated harms, and the history of and current options for prevention and intervention efforts.  Consideration will be given to the role of society and public policy in influencing our thinking and behavior concerning substance use and abuse.  Cr 3

 

SBS 346       Introduction to Social Services

This course examines the profession of social work from both historical and contemporary perspectives.  Students will explore specialty areas in social work such as mental health and disability, crime and violence, and family work.  Career options in the social work field will be explored.  Cr 3

 

SBS 349          Trauma: Social, Psychological, and Cultural Dimensions                                                                                                                 This course examines the social, political, and cultural history of the concept of trauma, focusing on the definition of traumatic and stressful events, common responses to those events, and models for conceptualizing responses to traumatic experiences. Topics include the diagnostic criteria of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, recommended treatment approaches, risk and protective factors associated with specific types of traumatic events, and the influences of differing cultural contexts. Areas of controversy within the field of trauma studies will also be explored. Prerequisites: Completion of a 100-level College Writing course (with grade of at least a C), SOC 100, PSY 101 & 102, and ANT 101).  Cr. 3

 

SBS 364         Introduction to Expressive Therapies

This course considers dreams from cross-cultural and historical perspectives as well as the theories of dream interpretation articulated in the works of Freud, Jung, and others. The course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of the theoretical importance of dreams in the history of psychology, to enrich their appreciation of dream images, and to refine their ability to apprehend the significance of their own and others’ dreams.

 

SBS 369         Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

SBS 390       Brain & Behavior

Survey of biological and environmental factors affecting the relationship between brain/mind and behavior. Topics will include brain organization, neural transmission, stress and emotion, learning, memory, violence, psychopathology, and the development of consciousness. Cr 3

 

SBS/ECE/LAE 399 Science in Early Childhood Education

This course examines key principles for effective teaching of science in early childhood education. The course will focus on the ability of young children to engage in scientific practices as well as the ways educators can guide children in the learning of science. Additionally, the types of opportunities young children have to participate in science investigations will be addressed. This course will connect children’s innate curiosity about their world with the development of a comprehensive science program in early childhood education. Recommendations from both the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) will be integrated into the curriculum.

 

SBS 399       Special Topics: Science in Early Childhood Education

 

SBS 399         Special Topics in SBS:  Science in Early Childhood Education

 

SBS 413          Job Search Skills for the 21st Century                                                                                                                                                       In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer.  Cr 1.5

 

SBS 430       Applied Social Policy

A review of contemporary social policy alternatives and an examination of the macro- and micro-level social policymaking processes.  Students complete an applied social policy project which might take the form of a policy paper, a grant proposal or written legislative testimony for a community agency.  Prerequisite:  junior standing or permission of the instructor.  Cross-listed with LOS 430.  Cr 3

 

SBS 447         Internship

This course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413.   Cr 3-6

 

SBS 450         Approaches to Assessing Individual Differences in Children

A survey of methods used to evaluate the developing child for abilities and disabilities. There will be an emphasis on understanding the interrelatedness of social, psychological, educational, physical-developmental, and health related assessments, as well as the cultural meaning of individual and group assessments. 

 

SCI 105        Biological Principles I

An introduction to scientific principles underlying the unit and diversity of life.  Prerequisite:  students must have fulfilled the University minimum proficiency requirements in writing and mathematics.  Cr 3

 

SCI 106        Laboratory Biology I

Laboratory experiences illustrating concepts and principles introduced in SCI 105K. Must be taken concurrently with SCI 105K.  Cr 1.5

 

SCI 108        Chemistry for Health Sciences

A one-semester introduction to general, organic and biological chemistry for the health sciences. Topics include acids and bases, pH, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, the chemistry of organic compounds; carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids. This course is not suitable for chemistry majors, biology majors, or pre-professionals (pre-dental, pre-medical, pre-veterinary).  Cr 3

 

SCI 113        Principles of Chemistry I

A presentation of fundamental principles of chemical science. These principles will be presented in quantitative terms and illustrated by examples of their applications in laboratories and in ordinary non-laboratory experience. This course and SCI 114 (normally taken concurrently) provide the basis for further study of chemistry. Prerequisite: satisfaction of USM math minimum proficiency requirements.  Cr 3

 

SCI 114        Laboratory Techniques I

Laboratory experiments to illustrate the principles that are presented in SCI 113K lectures. Three laboratory hours per week combining recitation and practical lab work. Co-requisite: SCI 113.  Cr 1

 

SCI 170        Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence in human anatomy and physiology.  It introduces basic principles of physiology and anatomy through chemistry, cellular structure and function, genetics, and embryology.   This course discusses several physiologic systems including the muscular, skeletal, and integumentary systems.  Prerequisites:  students should have a basic biology and chemistry from high school courses, GED, or successful completion of SCI 105 or SCI 100.  SCI 170K must be taken concurrently with SCI 171K.  Cr 3

 

SCI 171        Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab

Laboratory experiences illustrating topics introduced in SCI 170K.  Must be taken concurrently with SCI 170K.  Cr 1

 

SCI 209        Human Genetics

This course examines the role of heredity in human growth, development, and behavior.  Decision making, ethical issues and societal responsibilities related to genetic disorders will be discussed.  Prerequisites:  SCI 100K or SCI 107K/SCI 171K.  This course is cross-listed with SBS 209.  Cr 3

 

SCI 240        Applied Botany with Lab

The growth, structure, reproduction, and physiology of plants will be studied, and the role of plants in human affairs will be discussed in this combined lecture and laboratory/field course. Prerequisites: SCI 105/106.  Cr 4.5

 

SCI 252        Medical Microbiology with Lab

This lecture and laboratory course introduces basic medical microbiology and focuses on the viruses, bacteria, protozoans, and multi-cellular organisms which cause human diseases. It also discusses epidemiology and the immune system. This course meets the requirements of nursing and allied health programs. Prerequisite: SCI 107 or SCI 270/271. Cr 4

SCI 336           Intro to Public Health

This course provides an overview of the public health system and examines the purpose, history, organization, approach, functions and determinants of health.  The course places special emphasis on current health issues from our daily lives to highlight the relevance of public health.  Cr 3

 

SCI 369           Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles

In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

SCI 380        Pathophysiology I

This course examines the biology of noninfectious illnesses.  Emphasis will be placed on cellular biology, cancer, immunity, inflammation, and the cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems.  Prerequisites:  Microbiology, Human Anatomy and Physiology.  Cr 3

   

SCI 413           Job Search Skills in the 21st Century

In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5

 

SCI 447           Internship

This course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413.   Cr 3-6         

 

SOC 100       Introduction to Sociology

The fundamental concepts, principles, and methods of sociology; analyzes the influence of social and cultural factors upon human behavior;

evaluates effect of group processes, social classes, stratification, and basic institutions on contemporary society.  Cr 3